Category Archives: Uncategorized

“The Quest for Cod” with Mary Everett-Patriquin

Program for Sunday, October 24, 2021

The Cape Cod Maritime Museum‘s mission is to preserve and interpret the rich maritime culture of Cape Cod and the Islands, highlighting maritime history, art, and marine science. Mary Everett-Patriquin’s presentation explores one of the museum’s newest exhibits, “Quest for Cod: Two Hundred Years of Fishing in Provincetown.” Learn about the port’s rise during the boom years in the Age of Sail, from the nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries; the development of new fishing boats and technologies in the 1960s; and some of the factors in fishing’s decline in recent decades.

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0sce2opj0rGtdhJCqc2OE8kF5A8oH46O2Q

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.  Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

 

Mary Everett-Patriquin holds a Master’s degree in Anthropology and Museum Studies from Arizona State University. Her last position was as Assistant Director of a small museum and archaeological site in Phoenix. After moving to the Cape to be closer to family, she started as the Cape Cod Maritime Museum’s Public Programs Coordinator in May of 2019. Although from a land-locked part of the upper midwest, she loves Cape Cod and learning about the sea.

“Your Local Land Trust in Action” with Joanna Buffington 

Program for Sunday, October 17, 2021

Eastham Conservation Foundation (ECF) board member Joanna Buffington will highlight some of the foundation’s current and ongoing projects, including protecting diamondback terrapins, managing invasive species and collaborations with other land trusts.  ECF is an all-volunteer non-profit membership organization started in 1978 by a group of residents concerned about protecting Eastham’s environment and natural habitats from development. Now more than 300 acres of land are protected through deeded gifts, land purchases, and conservation restrictions on some private lands that prevent further development. ECF works with the Town of Eastham’s Open Space Committee and Division of Natural Resources, as well as with other Land Trusts, on stewardship programs and educational initiatives.

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAtd-6rrzkiH9AiVU0Fgqp5H1Pk7nLPTplk

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.  Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

Joanna Buffington grew up spending most of her summers on Cape Cod, and purchased a home here in 1994.  She moved to Eastham about 10 years ago after retiring from the US Public Health Service where she spent 20 years as a medical officer and disease detective with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Dr. Buffington serves on multiple Town Committees, including the Board of Health, Open Space, and Strategic Planning Committees and is a dedicated volunteer for protection of the environment and wildlife, through work with Mass Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary and the Eastham Conservation Foundation (ECF).

Beginnings of the Provincetown Players with Bob Seay

Program for Sunday, September 26, 2021

Eugene O’Neill and Charles Demuth

“Beginnings” is a rare recording of some of the survivors and descendants of the original Provincetown Players made in 1986. Featuring Mary Heaton Vorse’s two sons, Joel O’Brien and Heaton Vorse, along Trixie Hapgood Faust and Miriam Hapgood, daughters of Provincetown Players’ founders Hutchins and Neith Boyce Hapgood, “Beginnings” takes us back to Provincetown in 1915. They were all teenagers when the famed Provincetown theater group formed. Join us for a fascinating slice of local history and a glimpse into the founding of modern American Theater. Bob Seay will share context and photo images from that era.

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUqcOioqTgvGdcVLflspXIJo_PvAuE1flPH

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.  Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

On July 15, 1915, writers Hutchins Hapgood and his wife Neith Boyce Hapgood put their children to bed and entertained their friends with two short plays staged on their veranda overlooking Provincetown Harbor.  It was the first production of what would become the Provincetown Players. In 1916, Mary Heaton Vorse bought Lewis Wharf and the ramshackle fishing shack built on it. She let the Provincetown Players build a small stage inside the shack and put enough wooden benches to seat 100 people.

The Provincetown Players became one of the most influential of the small, subscription theater groups that sprang up across America during the first two decades of the 20th century. Founded in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and later transplanted to Greenwich Village, it was the only such organization exclusively devoted to producing American plays. The Players’ success in developing new American playwrights, most notably Eugene O’Neill and Susan Glaspell, has earned Provincetown its special place in American theater history as the “birthplace of American drama.”

“Ellen LeBow Turns Her Gaze on (her) Haiti”

Program for Sunday, September 19, 2021

After the devastating earthquake and hurricane in August this year in Haiti, following the assassination of the president, the Fellowship takes a look and leads a discussion about this special place, home of the first slave uprising in the New World. In “Haiti, I’m Sorry” (PI, 9/2/21) Ellen LeBow shares impressions from the many ways and the 25 years she has come to see and feel Haiti’s people, especially those from one island community where she helped to build an Arts Center in the 1990’s. Members of Nauset Fellowship will talk with her, discuss some ways Haitian communities on Cape Cod can help us find ways to help Haiti’s people help themselves right now.

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMkf-GrpjIrGdcetrH1gue9dqQPgtIF4Li_

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.  Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

Ellen Raquel LeBow is an artist, cartoonist, and Provincetown Independent contributor from Wellfleet. She is the coordinator of ART/MATENWA and RARA, a local project that works to bring sustainability through art to women in the village of Matènwa. Haiti, and is on the founding board of Wellfleet Preservation Hall.

“Wellfleet’s Last Indian? Delilah Gibbs and her Contemporaries” with Sheryl Jaffe

Program for Sunday, August 22, 2021

Delilah Sampson Gibbs left us with very few but very intriguing and fascinating records. She is known as a “widow and last of her tribe” in this vicinity. She is a mysterious figure in Wellfleet’s history. Her step-mother-in-law was Patience Gibbs, a Negro woman born in Yarmouth, who lived on Patience Brook. Drusilla Cole Laha was a white woman who was a member of the Congregational church along with Patience. All three women were known as healers of the sick. Women and people of color often have not left us with much historical record. Their lives were often not recorded with diligence, but are worth examination. Sheryl Jaffe’s talk will focus on these women and the story of Delilah’s land.c2

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEqcuusqTgrEtT-wWb0GMhRyO1v8094qQO9

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.  Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

Sheryl Jaffe has been the coordinator at the Wellfleet Historical Society & Museum for three years. She is also an artist and a teacher, a swimmer and a papermaker. She holds a BA in Multicultural Art Education from the University Without Walls and an MA in Art Education from the University of Massachusetts.

“Drawn into the Scene” – painting with Amy Sanders

Program for Sunday, August 15, 2021

Amy Sanders paints in the lesser known medium of dry pastel, and uses the beauty of the natural world as her inspiration. Her highly realistic style renders the intricacies of both wildlife and landscapes, surpassing what can be captured in a photograph. Join her for a short demonstration of this medium along with a discussion of its history and technique. The roots of the soft pastel medium, with its intense colors and permanence,  can be traced back to prehistoric cave paintings, and is now enjoying a modern resurgence of popularity. Questions, comments and observations will be welcome throughout.

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAqd-mgrjovG9BC5tW3b_ciW_ODq-RixD8M

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.  Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

A year round resident of the Outer Cape for the last 34 years, Amy Sanders lives in Truro on a property originally deeded to her ancestors by the King of England. In 2016, she opted to open a new chapter in life and shift from a career as a special education teacher to that of being a fine artist. Amy works closely with the nature all around her, both as an artist and as a volunteer at Wild Care. An award-winning artist, Sanders is a Signature Member of the Pastel Society of America, and a respected art juror in the art show circuit. Her work resides in collections throughout New England and is represented exclusively by the Addison Art Gallery of Orleans, Massachusetts.

Fear, then Connection: Provincetown’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic with Scott Penn, John Braden and Stephen Kovacev

Program for Sunday, July 25, 2021

Fear, then Connection: Provincetown’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic

There is perhaps no other community so profoundly affected by HIV and AIDS as Provincetown and these effects have been archived at the Provincetown History Project.

The first cases were diagnosed in 1982. By 1996, the virus had claimed the lives of 385 people—more than one-tenth of the town’s permanent population. The town rallied support for those afflicted and when news of Provincetown’s support services began to emerge, many who were diagnosed with the illness moved there to live out their final days and found a healing refuge.  Join us at as we remember the epidemic with three men who lived through it: Scott Penn, John Braden and Stephen Kovacev. 

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMlcOuqpjMjGNb5fJr5ESkaQMBw7wGmVUff

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.  

Scott Penn was born and raised in Hyannis.  He was the Executive Director of Outer Cape Health Services from 1986 to 2001.

John Braden moved to Provincetown in the early 1990’s after being diagnosed with AIDS. Although he expected to die there, he has survived and prospered and now oversees WOMR as its Executive Director.

Stephen Kovacev is a 68 year old athlete living with AIDS in Provincetown. After nearly dying from the disease in 1997, in 2014 he became the first AIDS survivor to complete the Boston Marathon and he continues to run marathons around the world today.

Unitarian Universalism: Moving into the Future with Pat O’Brien and Karen Dattilo

Program for Sunday, July 18, 2021

What are the most important issues being addressed by the Unitarian Universalist Association today?  Join Pat O’Brien and Karen Dattilo for a report on the organization’s current goals and activities. They will update the audience about highlights from the General Assembly, including the WARE lecture by Stacey Abrams and Desmond Meade. They will report on what the organization hopes and suggests our Fellowship follows with interest and commitment. There will be ample time for questions and discussion.

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAtc-CtrT4tEtapi-MPXvzzM5iDw3f-6HJw

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

Pat O’Brien and Karen Dattilo are members of the Nauset Fellowship Unitarian Universalists who served as our congregation’s delegates to the UU General Assembly held virtually on June 23-27, 2021.

Shipwrecks of Cape Cod: Stories of Tragedy and Triumph with Don Wilding

Program for Sunday, July 11, 2021

Cape Cod’s outer beach has always been known for its shipwrecks. Between 1626 and the mid-20th century, this solitary 40-mile stretch of beach and sandbars saw the demise of over 3,000 vessels. It’s been said that if all the wrecks were raised, one could walk from Provincetown to Chatham without getting his or her feet wet. Join Cape Cod historian Don Wilding, author of the new book, Shipwrecks of Cape Cod: Stories of Tragedy & Triumph, for a look back at some of these disasters, such as the Jason in 1893, the Monomoy Disaster of 1902, and the Castagna in 1914, as well as the heroism of the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYkdeigrD0uGda8YmNcLzLTI9seQGEICW9H

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

Since the start of the millennium, Don Wilding has been telling stories of Cape Cod Outer Beach history. An award-winning writer and editor for Massachusetts newspapers since 1985, Don has contributed the “Shore Lore” history column for The Cape Codder newspaper of Orleans, and is the author of two other books: Henry Beston’s Cape Cod: How The Outermost House Inspired a National Seashore and A Brief of History of Eastham: On the Outer Beach of Cape Cod. He is also a tour guide and lecturer, and has taught local history classes for adults on the Outer Cape.

Native Plants of Cape Cod with Kristin Andres

Program for Sunday, June 13, 2021

A native plant enthusiast, Kristin Andres promotes sustainable land care practices and the use of native plants in the landscape. Kristin describes herself as slightly obsessed with observing and photographing nature and strives to share her passionate appreciation of nature whenever possible. Kristin will introduce us to some plant species, including those growing in the Association to Preserve Cape Cod’s educational demonstration garden, and discuss how native plants can have a positive influence on water quality and climate change. Learn more about the Association’s Native Plant Project here.

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-register for this program at:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUrd-yrqj0sGtCcA8PTGL4vn9hpgA-MGHw9

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Meeting platform will open at 9:30 for informal socializing. Program will begin promptly at 10:00.

Kristin Andres is the Associate Director for Education for the Association to Preserve Cape Cod (APCC), an environmental advocacy organization. Before joining APCC as a staff member, she worked for the town of Chatham as its first Conservation Agent for more than 15 years. Kristin serves on several boards and committees, including the Ecological Landscape Alliance, Chatham Friends of Trees, Friends of Sylvan Gardens, Senior Environmental Corps and the town of Chatham South Coastal Harbor Plan Committee. She’s the regional liaison for Grow Native Massachusetts and an honorary trustee of the Chatham Conservation Foundation. She writes a biweekly column for the Cape Cod Chronicle on topics of ecology and the environment.